RANDOM?

009

I tease John because with his orderly nature (and it’s just as well he’s orderly for he has a decidedly disorderly wife) – he doesn’t care for ‘random’. When I once suggested he put patterned tiles in amongst plain ones ‘at random’, he retorted that it wasn’t random, it was ‘just a mess’.

I made a crib quilt for William, Elisabeth and Robert’s son, before he was born. It is a pleasure to make such a small item. We discussed various plans and colour schemes but never came to any conclusion.

I’m by no means an expert quilter and technically I’m not at all good. Other members of our craft group, and Anne, Robert’s mother, produce items of stunningly arranged colours and fearsomely tiny stitches, with corners that invariably match, that put my bodged efforts to shame.

They are very kind and encouraging in their comments on my work, but I am not deceived.

So I decide to try a new technique which is to applique squares of material to the top of an otherwise plain quilt, so it’s really a form of applique rather than patchwork. I choose an ivory coloured cotton with a very faint pattern for both the front and back of the quilt. Basic maths being useful here I figure out what size to make the patches and how to place them and eventually I decide each square will measure, when sewn in place, 3 inches square so there will be 20 x 3” square pieces. in 5 rows of 4 squares, and that no two patches will be the same. The quilt will be ‘random’.

I go through my stash of material and select in neutral greys and beiges with a few touches of gold silk here and there. I select one plain white. I chose one red pattern. I buy four fat quarters of grey and beige and then I cut out 20 squares and iron the turnovers into place. Now I lay out the quilt, and I carefully place the 20 patches on it. I put the darkest squares in the four corners and then I lay the remaining squares out carefully, like a pack of cards, adjusting them continually so that each square is well placed and balanced against its neighbours.

Then I tack, and finally I sew. In a surprisingly shot time, it is ready. I am pleased with it, and I hope the boy, in the fullness of time, enjoys driving his cars along its ‘roadways’.

Oh this, I’ll say when people ask about it. Just something I pulled together from material I had lying about. I just threw the pieces of material down and then sewed them on in that random pattern.

Dear reader, don’t believe a word of it. Random my a—. as John would say!

I tease John because with his orderly nature (and it’s just as well he’s orderly for he has a decidedly disorderly wife) – he doesn’t care for ‘random’. When I once suggested he put patterned tiles in amongst plain ones ‘at random’, he retorted that it wasn’t random, it was ‘just a mess’.

I made a crib quilt for William, Elisabeth and Robert’s son, before he was born. It is a pleasure to make such a small item. We discussed various plans and colour schemes but never came to any conclusion.

I’m by no means an expert quilter and technically I’m not at all good. Other members of our craft group, and Anne, Robert’s mother, produce items of stunningly arranged colours and fearsomely tiny stitches, with corners that invariably match, that put my bodged efforts to shame.

They are very kind and encouraging in their comments on my work, but I am not deceived.

So I decide to try a new technique which is to applique squares of material to the top of an otherwise plain quilt, so it’s really a form of applique rather than patchwork. I choose an ivory coloured cotton with a very faint pattern for both the front and back of the quilt. Basic maths being useful here I figure out what size to make the patches and how to place them and eventually I decide each square will measure, when sewn in place, 3 inches square so there will be 20 x 3” square pieces. in 5 rows of 4 squares, and that no two patches will be the same. The quilt will be ‘random’.

I go through my stash of material and select in neutral greys and beiges with a few touches of gold silk here and there. I select one plain white. I chose one red pattern. I buy four fat quarters of grey and beige and then I cut out 20 squares and iron the turnovers into place. Now I lay out the quilt, and I carefully place the 20 patches on it. I put the darkest squares in the four corners and then I lay the remaining squares out carefully, like a pack of cards, adjusting them continually so that each square is well placed and balanced against its neighbours.

Then I tack, and finally I sew. In a surprisingly shot time, it is ready. I am pleased with it, and I hope the boy, in the fullness of time, enjoys driving his cars along its ‘roadways’.

Oh this, I’ll say when people ask about it. Just something I pulled together from material I had lying about. I just threw the pieces of material down and then sewed them on in that random pattern.

Dear reader, don’t believe a word of it. Random my a—. as John would say!

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About adhocannie
I am a good natured woman with a long memory and a swift tongue. I like loooking at things and thinking about them. Also food, clothes, travel, reading, sewing. I try to see the ridiculous in things, but sobriety of reflection keeps edgting in. I have husband, children, grandchildren, friends... I feel rich in things that matter. I am a happy exile. I like writing. I do not like talking about me (though I do.). You willl be much more interesting.

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