STANDING IN A PLACE OF GRACE

STANDING IN A PLACE OF GRACE

I’ve been thinking on the nature of democracy which, while an imperfect institution, is better than any known alternative. I was rather alarmed to hear people (good people in my estimation) stating that the result of the referendum ought to be disregarded. If you profess to be a democracy, the will of the people has to be accepted, even if it were by only one vote. Otherwise it’s the thin edge of the wedge: reject one result because you deem it unsuitable or inconvenient and you could end up in a one party state before you could say Vladimir Putin.

David Cameron seemed, when he started out, an example of the best you can expect from the Tories. Courteous and calm, with compassion, having suffered grief and loss in spite of his privileged background, loyal to his friends, untouched by financial or sexual scandal, you thought as he took office, he’ll do, and good luck to him too. Yet he has proved to be that most worrying of failures – an incompetent, and of poor judgement. He has gambled with our future stability and well-being – and lost – but even had he won, the risks he took were not worth what he might have gained.

Referenda would appear to be a blunt and unsubtle instrument. In the Scottish referendum on Independence, Cameron he did not lose outright. But the putting of the question and the size of the vote that it attracted effectively legitimised the Independence position, and strengthened their case even though they did not win that vote. The issue has certainly not gone away. I was surprised on our recent travels in Scotland to see the Saltire flying all over the place, and a fair number of car stickers saying, Ask me now and I’ll say Yes. It was apparent that people who a year ago were vehemently antagonistic to the idea of independence were far more relaxed about it now. It is my belief, if the question keeps being put in its present form, that the Scots will eventually vote Yes and then it will not be possible to deny them. It is undeniably the case that the question can be put however many times it takes, and regardless of the intervals, until the desired answer is given, but the electorate only has to say Yes once, for the outcome to be virtually irrevocable. Westminster should have remembered this. There are two other factors that were overlooked. The electorate believes in fair play, and it does not respond submissively to bullying.

We have seen with referenda that the electorate will vote Leave or Remain as instructed, but that it is not necessarily giving those answers to the questions which it was asked.

My guess is that so far as Brexit is concerned, London and the South being prosperous and near Europe largely voted Remain it being convenient for them. Scotland voted Remain to the last county and it has always been pro-Europe as a counter-balance to England, but the Scots also voted Remain in support of independence. The Irish in Northern Ireland voted for Remain in support of a United Ireland.

The English Midlands and Northern counties voted Leave in a spirit of dissatisfaction with Cameron’s government; and English coastal areas voted Leave because of their despair over having to cope with an unending influx of migrants with no government acknowledgement of their difficulties or help with the accompanying problems.

I’m quite sure that a fair proportion of those people who voted Leave for the reasons I have argued, did not actually expect that the overall vote would be to Leave and so got a result that was unexpected. Protest votes are dangerous and best kept for bi-elections!

George Osborne, of unlamented memory, was always described as being a wily strategist, which clearly was NOT the case, since the outcome here has been a catastrophe for him. But you cannot enjoy such a reputation for no reason. I’ve come to the conclusion that to be a good strategist, you need to be able to predict the reactions of a wide variety of people, including ones unlike yourself. People, as I have attempted to argue, vote from different motivations. Some vote for self interest; some vote altruistically; some vote in hatred or prejudice; some vote in family tradition. George Osborne, I suggest, understood extremely well the turpitude of his shoddy colleagues (of all parties) in Westminster, but he had no understanding of the hopes and dreams his fellow countrymen carried in their secret hearts.

Every incoming British prime minister, I believe, sets out with the goodwill of the British people.   Mrs May, I think, has so far conducted herself (and God knows I have no sympathy for the Tories) so that she still stands in that place of grace where we will give her the benefit of the doubt and wish success to her endeavours. Let us pray then that she continues as she has begun, for she is going to need all the good will she can muster to steer us through the rough times ahead.

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About adhocannie
I am a good natured woman with a long memory and a swift tongue. I like loooking at things and thinking about them. Also food, clothes, travel, reading, sewing. I try to see the ridiculous in things, but sobriety of reflection keeps edgting in. I have husband, children, grandchildren, friends... I feel rich in things that matter. I am a happy exile. I like writing. I do not like talking about me (though I do.). You willl be much more interesting.

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